New book announcement

Narrowcast Nightmares Book CoverAngharad, Jin and Tsuyoshi have survived four months in Zapville. While Tsuyoshi struggles with his difficult relationships, Angharad struggles with complicated attractions and her tense friendship with Jin. New tests from their mysterious overlord lead to new encounters and strange bedfellows. But when things take a darker and more desperate turn, not everyone they know will survive.

Most book retailers | Amazon AU | Amazon UK | Amazon US | Smashwords

New book announcement

Electric Shock book coverSick of the small life imposed on her, sixteen year old Angharad is seeking escape. When she wakes up on the other side of the Gate what she gets instead is a tighter prison than she’s ever known. With no way out and no way to find her mysterious jailer, she finds herself relying on the people trapped with her: Tsuyoshi, an angry Canadian art student, well-meaning Josephine, the secretive Dr Yeoh, and Jin, a child soldier. But in this technological trap beyond anything she’s ever known not everyone is who they seem, and even Angharad is unsure what is true about her own life.

Available at: Most online retailers | Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Smashwords

New book

Four Bodies in Space book coverSet on the space ships and space stations of the Union of Allied Planets, Four Bodies in Space follows Commander Solaris, a scientific officer on a small ship that just wants to be left alone to check her experiments in peace. A peace threatened first by the murder of an ambassador and then by the friendly overtures of his emotionally volatile widow. With her ship in danger and her future on the line, Solaris can’t hold back her curiosity about the murder.

Into this mess steps newly promoted Captain Li, eager and a little too friendly, and fascinated by the psychic gift Solaris considers her greatest burden. Solaris would rather cling to everything she holds dear than accept the difficulty of something new and untried even if pushing away Captain Li’s help risks damage to her career and the people she wants to protect, but fleeing from Jennifer Li’s hand in friendship could mean falling into the killer’s hands instead…

Available at: Most online retailers | Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon AU

New collection of short fiction

It’s been a while, but I’ve finally released my personal anthology of short fiction:

Constellation of Neon LightsSix short tales of life, death and optimism from Luna Harlow.

A young woman looks back on a grandparent and the nature of stories. Robots question the meaning of their existence. An old woman time travels through memory. A young man leaves a party and questions what he wants from life. Thirty-somethings talk about chemistry over brunch.

Amazon US | Amazon AU | Amazon UK | ibooks | Kobo | Scribd | books2read universal link | Smashwords

 

Site housekeeping

I switched site themes, to something that I think will work better with the way I’ll be using the website for the next while. Still purple, though, because that’s the best colour.

I’ve also updated other works with links to several new short stories I’ve published on Amazon.

You may have noticed I haven’t posted a lot of reviews here lately – and that’s the way it shall stay until I’ve finished with this year’s classes, at the very least.

November 2016 recap and links

 

That’s a lot more reading done last month than I realised.

Some interesting links:

How a Publisher Markets Your Book by Jessica Faust.

A profile about Leonard Cohen in The New Yorker, looking at his new album, from before he passed on. RIP Cohen, a musical great.

Elena Ferrante, Charlotte Brontë and how anonymity protects against female writing stereotypes by Erin Nyborg at The Conversation.

20 Typography Mistakes Every Beginner Makes – And How You Can Avoid Them by Janie Kliever at Canva Design School.

Remembering Sheri S. Tepper, Eco-Feminist Sci-Fi Firebrand by Genevieve Valentine at npr books. Tepper is a complicated figure to look back on, because she was an outspoken feminist but also in favour of eugenics, and it can be difficult to reconcile those two things.

The prospect before us by Patrick Nielsen Hayden at Making Light about writing SF/F in a world with US Pres-elect Trump.

Why Fiction Matters by Nancy Jane Moore at Book View Cafe.

Death of the hatchet job: Book reviewing used to be a blood sport. How has it become so benign and polite? by D J Taylor at New Statesman. Interesting read. There’s still plenty of amateur reviewers willing to say you’ve written the worst book in the history of humanity on goodreads but I have noticed in certain sectors pro  and semi-pro reviewing is somewhat timid. Also even amateur reviewers of romance novels seem more likely to say ‘I didn’t enjoy but it was okay, 4 stars’, which is fascinating. This article OTOH locates trends of reviewing within the history of reviewing.

The Gone Girl With The Dragon Tattoo On The Train – Why are there so many books with “girl” in the title? by Emily St. John Mandel at FiveThirtyEight. I’ve definitely linked other articles of people noticing this phenomenon before.

Who is the Genius Behind Merriam-Webster’s Social Media? In Conversation with a Dictionary by Emily Temple at LitHub.

October 2016 recap and links

 

Some interesting links:

Why I review everything I read by Teresa Preston at Book Riot.

SEXtember: What reading romance taught me about sex by Natalie Ng at meld magazine.

An interesting interview with Jill Shalvis at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books. It’s fascinating to see how many writers assume it’s only them that write messy drafts while other writers must be writing such clean drafts.

Pro-”Gay For You” Arguments In The Romance Genre (And Why They’re All Still Bi/Pan Erasure) by Jenny Trout.

5 Years a Novelist: A Retrospective on the Writing Life by Kameron Hurley.

An AMA with Wesley Chu.

An awesome article in The New Yorker about Ursula Le Guin.

An interview at The Design Files with Penguin book designer Allison Colpoys.

Working with Time I Actually Have, Not the Time I’d Like To Have by Peter M. Ball.

On the horror genre: Guest Post: “New Voices” by Mark Morris at Civilian Reader; The Hidden Horrors of Craig Davidson by Tobias Carroll at Electric Lit; and Interview with Victor LaValle by Maurice Broaddus at Nightmare Magazine.

Margaret Atwood: ‘All dystopias are telling you is to make sure you’ve got a lot of canned goods and a gun’ by Charlotte Higgins at The Guardian.

On editing: An intimate relationship: editors and writers at the Radio National archives of The Book Show (it’s from 2008 but it’s still interesting) and What is structural editing (from 2007); Teaching Stuff: Vast and Cool and Unsympathetic by Richard Chwedyk at the SFWA blog.

Why I Don’t Want to Be a Queer Book Detective Anymore by Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian.